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Related hospitals

History of Addenbrooke's and the Rosie

> Brookfields Hospital

> Hunstanton

> Mill Road Maternity Hospital

> Chesterton Hospital

> Fulbourn

> Douglas House

 

Brookfields Hospital

 

In 1884 the Cambridge Corporation bought some land on Mill Road to build the Cambridge Infectious Diseases Hospital. It later became known as the Cambridge Borough Isolation Hospital and finally in 1947 when it became part of the United Cambridge Hospitals, (UCH), Brookfields Hospital. It continued to care for infectious disease patient until Stage II of the Hills Road site was completed.

 

In October 1887 Addenbrooke’s Hospital transferred a patient with scarlet fever to the Cambridge Infectious Diseases Hospital; there are numerous references in the Board of Governors Minutes Books of the late 19th and early 20th centuries about the care of patients with infected diseases.

It was also known as ‘The Sanatorium’ and they took cases of typhoid, scarlet fever, diphtheria and smallpox.

 

The Archives at Addenbrooke’s has one item relating to Brookfields:
AHRO 5/1 Ward Stores Brookfields: Brookfields Hospital Stores Issues (1952-1967). We also have several photographs of gardens and greenhouses. There are references to the Hospital in the Minute books and Annual Reports of the Council of Governors during 1948-1974 when it was part of the UCH.

 

The archives of Brookfields Hospital are held in the Cambridgeshire Record Office - Archives Service

 

Cambridgeshire Record Office,
Box RES 1009
Shire Hall
Castle Hill
Cambridge
CB3 0AP

Tel: 01223 717 281

Details of the material held can be found on The National Archives Hospital Records Database at The National Archives

 

 

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Hunstanton

Addenbrooke's Convalescent Home and The Hunstanton Home of Recovery

 

The Addenbrooke’s Hospital Annual Report of 1907 says that:

‘Addenbrooke’s Convalescent Home opened in June 1899 after 7 years experience in hired houses at Felixstowe and Dovercourt the committee decided last year on building a house suitable for their work at Hunstanton. The building now nearly complete has room for 12 patients and hopes to open in April’.

 

In 1905 Addenbrooke’s Convalescent Home was at Dovercourt near Harwich in Essex.

 

The Hunstanton Home of Recovery was Addenbrooke's Hospital's own convalescent home at Hunstanton on the north Norfolk coast. It also housed the Rebecca Waley Home of Rest for Nurses in a separate wing. The latter was established by a bequest from Charlotte Rebecca Waley, 1867-1920, who lived for many years in Norwich where she worked as Lady Almoner at the County Hospital. In 1937 a ground floor dining room and additional ward accommodation were built and in 1956 a large patients' sun lounge added. On reorganisation of the NHS in the 1970s control passed to the King's Lynn Health District.

 

The records of the Hospital Archives hold records of Addenbrooke's
Convalescent Home and the Hunstanton Home of Recovery.
These include the minutes of committee meetings 1907-1948) and patient registers (1899-1967).

 

 

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Mill Road Maternity Hospital

 

In 1838 the Cambridge Union Workhouse opened in Mill Road Cambridge. Workhouses where places for the poor to live and work.

 

In 1906 it was renamed the Poor Law Infirmary and up to the start of the Second World War the infirmary dealt mainly with male and female geriatric cases. It had a small maternity unit in which deliveries increased from 23 in 1934 to over 300 in 1939.

 

Mill road in 2006

Mill Road in 2006

During this period there was increased pressure to build a purpose built maternity hospital for Cambridge. Cambridgeshire County Council had planned to convert Mill Road into a complete maternity unit but during the war it was classified an Emergency Medical Services hospital.

All patients, except maternity patients were evacuated. It was used at first for medical and surgical patients evacuated from London and then for service personnel. Later, two wards were allocated for maternity cases from east London.

 

In 1944 there were over 1,000 births at Mill Road. After the War the County Council decided to turn Mill Road into a Maternity Unit and in 1946 plans were drawn up for a hospital of 150 beds. These plans were shelved because of the imminent creation of the National Health Service (NHS).

 

However, after the start of the NHS in 1948 the County Council went ahead with the Maternity Hospital and on 5 July 1948 it became the Maternity Hospital, Mill Road and part of the United Cambridge Hospitals. It was made up of 91 beds, a 6-bed premature baby unit, and 24 beds for female geriatric patients

 

In 1961 the Ministry of Health agreed to move the Maternity Hospital to the New Site with the move to be made in 1975 with the Phase III development of the site. The move still had not happened by 1980 when the East Anglian Regional Health Authority agreed to the re-siting of the Mill Road Hospital to the New Site beginning in 1988-89 and to be finished by 1990-91.

 

However, in the same year David Robinson a local philanthropist offered £3,000,000 to build a new maternity hospital on the Hills Road site as long as the planning and building were completed by 1983 and it was named after his mother. The Rosie Maternity Hospital opened in October 1983.

During its last full year 1982-3, over 4,000 babies were born in the two wards of the Mill Road Maternity Hospital.

 

The former Union Workhouse is now a model sheltered housing scheme renamed Ditchburn Place. It is named after the Master and Matron who were appointed in 1934.


The Addenbrooke’s Hospital Archives holds material about Mill Road dating from 1936 which includes Creed Registers, registers of births and death and admission and discharge registers. The catalogue for the records is available on-line.

 

The material relating to Mill Road when it was the workhouse are held in the Cambridgeshire Record Office - Archives Service

 

Cambridgeshire Record Office
Box RES 1009
Shire Hall
Castle Hill
Cambridge
CB3 0AP
(Tel: 01223 717 281)

Details of the material held can be found on The National Archives Hospital Records Database at The National Archives

 

 

 

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Chesterton Hospital

 

Chesterton Hospital was built in 1836-8 on the west side of Union Road in Chesterton, to the north of Cambridge and formed on 2nd April 1836 as the Chesterton Poor Law Union. It served villages surrounding Cambridge.

 

In 1948 with the introduction of the National Health Service it founded part of the United Cambridge Hospitals (UCH).

 

Addenbrooke’s Hospital Archives only holds reports of visits made to the Chesterton Institution 1930-64, (AHGR 3/2/3/6). However there are references to the Hospital in the Minute books of the Council of Governors and Annual Reports during 1948-1974 when it was part of the UCH.

 

The hospital buildings were demolished in 2003. The site has been redeveloped, partly housing and also a new health centre.

 

The archives of Chesterton Hospital are held in the Cambridgeshire Record Office - Archive Services

Cambridgeshire Record Office,
Box RES 1009
Shire Hall
Castle Hill
Cambridge
CB3 0AP

Tel: 01223 717 281

Details of the material held can be found on The National Archives Hospital Records Database at The National Archives

 

 

 

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Fulbourn

 

The Pauper Lunatic Asylum for the County and Borough of Cambridge and the Isle of Ely at Fulbourn opened in late 1858 as a result of the 1834 Act forcing every local authority to set up an asylum.

 

The County Asylums site has some good photos of Fulbourn:

> County Asylums

 

The University site for the Department of Psychiatry has a brief history of psychiatry in Cambridge:

> Department of Psychiatry

 

 

Fulbourn

Fulbourn

In 1993, Addenbrooke's, Fulbourn, the Rosie and their associated community services combined to form the Addenbrooke's NHS Trust.

In 2002, Fulbourn Hospital became part of the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust.

 

Addenbrooke's Hospital archives do not hold any records from Fulbourn.

 

A collection of ephemera relating to Fulbourn Hospital the hospital, including photographs newspaper articles and remembrances from patients and staff is held at the Ida Darwin Hospital.

 

Contact Nicholas Morgan for more details

 

Block 14,

Ida Darwin,

Fulbourn,

Cambridge

CB21 5EE

 

Tel: 01223 884 024

 

nicholas.morgan@cpft.nhs.uk

 

 

The archives of Fulbourn Hospital are held in the Cambridgeshire Record Office - Archive Services

 

Cambridgeshire Record Office
Box RES 1009
Shire Hall
Castle Hill
Cambridge
CB3 0AP

Tel: 01223 717 281

 

Details of the material held can be found on The National Archives Hospital Records Database at The National Archives

 

 

For a history of Fulbourn see: The Story of a Mental Hospital: Fulbourn, 1858-1983 by David H. Clark

> The Story of a Mental Hospital

 

 

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Douglas House

 

Douglas House on Trumpington Road was an annex of Addenbrooke’s Hospital and was formerly the Stella Maris Nursing Home.

 

Douglas House was built on land leased by Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1890, to Mrs Margaret Dunlop Gibson on Trumpington Road.

 

Douglas House

Douglas House

In Oct 1947 the then lease owners, the Business Transfers Ltd assigned the lease to the Stella Maris Nursing Home Ltd. The Stella Maris Nursing Home closed in 1951. It was later leased by the College to the Air Ministry and the Department of Social Services.

 

In 1954-5 the Ministry of Health agreed that Douglas House should be taken over primarily as a neurosurgical unit. The property was transferred from the Air Ministry on 1 April 1955. This was to be the first neurosurgical unit planned within the Eastern Region. (1954-55 United Cambridge Hospitals Annual Report p8).

 

However, the next annual report says that no progress has been made for the neurosurgical unit (p8). The report of 1956-7 reported that the unit would not happen because of the high cost, so it was proposed to make four wards for this purpose on the New Site (p9). It was then proposed to use Douglas House as an annex for Addenbrooke’s.


Material held in Addenbrooke’s Hospital Archives relating to Douglas House:

 

  • AHPR 7/8/1-6
    Registers of Surgical Operations: Douglas House Theatre Books (1959-1973)

  • AHGR 3/2/3/4
    Board Visitors report book: Douglas House (1950-1974)
    AHRF 7/9

  • Stella Maris Nursing Home: Photocopies of articles from local newspapers and correspondence (1951-2004)

 

 

 

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